What to Wear and Eat prior to a Life Line Screening Procedure and What to Expect during the Screening

Chronic diseases, such as diabetes, cancer, and heart diseases, are among the top causes of death in the United States. The sad reality is that they are detected in the body too late to administer treatment. Regular screening ensures that such diseases are caught before they become serious to cause harm. It is proven that treatments work best at the early stages of the diseases. The screenings also act as a preventive measure since they can tell if a person is at risk of contracting any disease. Life Line Screening is equipped with the latest technology to perform different types of screening.

What to Wear

Life Line Screenings requires patients to be prepared before the start of the procedure. The preparations include having the right clothing that does not interfere with the process. Carotid artery disease screening that detects stroke requires one to wear a short-sleeved shirt that is open at the collar. Artificial fibrillation that also checks for stroke requires a patient to wear two-piece loose clothing. Patients are also required not to wear a watch or pantyhose and not to apply oil. The same clothing goes for the abdominal aortic aneurysm, 6 for life package and ankle-brachial index.

What to Eat

Some screenings require a patient to eat the right of food or to abstain from eating for specified hours. The abdominal aortic aneurysm requires four hours fast prior to the procedure. Alternatively, one can eat a light meal that is non-greasy. Diabetic patients should, however, follow their diabetic meal plan and medication. Complete lipid panel, 6 for life package and glucose screenings requires 12 hours fast. Only water and medication are allowed during the fast.

What to Expect

Some of the Life Line Screening procedures are non-invasive and painless. After checking in and completing the paperwork, patients are then taken to meet the physicians. The procedures require patients to follow simple instructions as directed by the doctor. They will do a blood test that involves a small prick to draw a few drops of blood. The measurements of weight and height will then be taken. Procedures like bone density screening will require the patient to place a bare foot on the ultrasound machine for a few minutes. The peripheral arterial disease screening involves checking the systolic pressure in the limbs. The process will involve pressure cuffs placed around the arm, ultrasound device and electrodes. Other procedures such as carotid artery and abdominal aortic aneurysm screening require patients to lie on their back.

Learn more: http://californiablog.org/content/lifeline-screening-can-help-you-live-longer-life